Who’s To Blame When Rappers Jack Beats?

azealia banks purp Whos To Blame When Rappers Jack Beats?In case you didn’t hear about it last night or this morning, Azealia Banks once again found herself in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons. This time, she wasn’t beefing with, say, Nicki Minaj or Jim Jones—two of the Harlem native’s previous “enemies.” Nope, Banks done pissed off the wrong person in her latest feud, as she attempted to release a new single, Fantasea‘s “Esta Noche”, without the producer’s permission. The man behind the track is none other than the Netherlands’ Munchi, a stalwart in many producer/DJ circles.

When dude found out the track would be dropping without his blessing—meaning Banks likely just jacked the beat for her tape—he sounded off on his Twitter. Now, before I let y’all see just what he said, let me make one thing clear. I don’t think a social network is the best place to lash out about business. But in this case? Yeah, Banks deserved to get her just due here, even if I think it’s a two-wrongs-don’t-make-a-right situation given the fact she has repeatedly started “beefs” on Twitter.

But anyway, he’s a brief look at Munchi’s rant.

Munchi goes on to say he was offered $25,000 for the beat, which was met with a spirited tweet in “GTFO with this bitchshit.” Banks, of course, responded and said that “Esta Noche” would no longer be dropping as a single. But wait! She’s shooting a video for it, which means she can in fact still make money off it considering her latest video, “1991″, has more than 1 million views. That will make for a decent YouTube advertising check that, in all fairness, should lead to an equally decent check for Munchi. But will it? Probably not, unless he takes her to court like that whole Lord Finesse vs. Mac Miller mess.

But wait, is it really a mess? Yes and no, in my opinion. On one hand, jacking beats for mixtapes has long been the standard way for artists to build their free projects. Now, that’s not always the case, as more often than not these days rappers are basically putting out full-length albums on the house (no Slaughterhouse). But it does get really, really messy when these MCs are in turn shooting videos that in turn gets millions of views and some scrilla in advertising revenue. And never mind the fact that these tracks are often performed live, though figuring out how much a producer should receive per live performance seems, well, really fucking difficult.

Many times, issues like this, if nothing else, result in the producer getting their just due. And that often arrives by way of a nice lil’ settlement and plenty of publicity. Case in point: The Stuyvesants getting ripped the hell off by Will Smith’s son, Jaden Smith, which we wrote about here. Did you know of the Brooklyn team before this whole thing happened? I would hope so, but mostly likely you hadn’t. And that’s fine, of course, though I hope you’re checking for them now.

But I digress. Click page 2 below to keep reading.