.
Can We Stop Making Porn Music Videos and Album Covers Now?

Can We Stop Making Porn Music Videos and Album Covers Now?

facepalm Can We Stop Making Porn Music Videos and Album Covers Now?Blame Tumblr. Blame horny teenagers. Blame the lonely bros who sit at home in digital circle jerks. Blame Twitter. Blame the industry. Blame lazy, uninspired marketing. Hell, blame the entire Internet if you must, but hey everyone, can we please stop making pornographic music videos?

Look, I’m not some crazy ass finger wagging conservative who’s looking to ban pornography on the grounds of sin or anything like that. I’m all for freedom of speech and expression, and I understand that (legal) porn has its place. But it doesn’t necessarily have a place in music videos or parading as artwork for singles, albums, mixtapes, etc. In the not-so-distant past, people used to be able to hit up a site, spot the NSFW tags, and click (or not click) accordingly. But more and more these days, most bloggers are either too busy or too lazy to watch an entire music video to know if what they’re posting is actually porn or not.

Hell, sometimes bloggers post artwork that is no more than an Instagram-tinted vagina and have the post sitting on their frontpage. Yes, this actually happened, and yes, it was Mario’s new single; don’t click that if you’re at work. I’m not one to point fingers or anything, but shit, that’s a pretty big mistake and one that should be taken care of immediately, rather than ignored. Never mind the fact that you might cost someone their job because you were too careless to just glance over the artwork– or the fact that you could exercise that old concept of discretion and pass on posting a single’s artwork … but that’s another discussion entirely.

My point isn’t that some schlub might get the ax because he was too busy browsing porn-happy music sites and didn’t focus on his 9-to-5. It also isn’t to point out the fact that many of these videos and covers are further degrading women by commercializing the female body as a marketing tool like a hot cheeseburger in a shitty McDonald’s commercial. Honestly, I could go off for damn near a million words about how hip-hop … no, music in general hyper-sexualizes and degrades women, and how some females are on the front lines leading the warped degradation their own gender. But that’s not what I’m going for here.

My point is that by promoting music that uses straight-up pornography to sell itself will only speed up the process in which our collective brain is turning to the most base form of mush. There is hardly ever anything artistic, edgy, romantic, or redeemable about the particular videos and “artwork” I’m referencing. Take the video I saw about two weeks ago by some Wiz Khalifa jabroni—I think his name’s Berner? (who cares?)—that featured completely naked women dancing around in a wrestling ring.

Tell me, what does this do for music or our culture at large? What does a video from any member of the Maybach Music Group rapping at a strip club—with strippers getting naked right in front of them—do for anyone? Nothing. It makes me think we’re all just a bunch of cavemen involved in an endless circle jerk, rendering our parts useless because all we’re doing is jacking ourselves off into oblivion in the name of our over-stimulated, lonely, vacuous culture.

Continue reading by clicking page 2 below.

Pages: 1 2

56 Comments

  1. Matthew ?
    Oct 24, 2012 @ 11:25:00

    Actually, hip hop has its roots in the sound systems of Jamaican music. But I agree it did start as music.

  2. caramellow
    Oct 20, 2012 @ 06:20:00

    Good article. I typically don’t buy/download music from the kinds of artists who would be most likely to do this. The only brush I’ve had with NSFW art recently was Tabi Bonney’s Lovejoy Park mixtape. I remember Tabi commenting on Twitter or Instagram that early on, he had some issues with the mixtape’s availability for download because of the artwork, and some doctoring of the image was done for some sites. Tabi Bonney definitely isn’t the worst offender of this, but it seems like he’s really trying to ramp up his reach as an artist these days, so I understand why.

    It doesn’t surprise me that the kind of pandering described in the article is going on. But Instagram That Hoe? That sounds like something they woulda done in CB4 if it came out in 2012. Any artist that does this kind of stuff is just working a gimmick. It’s a race to the bottom, and it gets more ridiculous year after year.
    When I listen to hip-hop (and I do that much less than I used to), I try to go for the people who are offering something with more redeeming qualities than Instagram That Hoe. Sadly, the panderers often get the most coverage/hits/retweets on the Web. Again, I’m not surprised though, because as the article says, it’s certainly reflective of society at large these days. (To be fair, there were always pandering hip-hop artists, but something has changed–there’s more of them, they’re more explicit, they’re more eager to do it–I think a combination of things, but it’s definitely different nowadays.)
    On a less serious note, can we start calling Rick Ross shirtless pics NSFW? Tryna keep my eyes from bleeding,

  3. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 11:31:00

    Rap is a part of hip hop MUSIC. hip-hop music, is a music genre consisting of a stylized rhythmic music that commonly ACCOMPANIES rapping. As i said before, a little more research. Hip hop has its roots in electronic music. You do know rap more than MOST, not all.

  4. TeoneSofle
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 11:00:00

    Spare me the crap & get your head out of your ass…you sound insolent. I know my rap better than most people. It was originally defined as part of the hip hop culture as “rhythmic speech”, i.e. the modern version of poetry (but not accepted as such due to its upbringing which I will not mention here because it revolves around the touchy topic of discrimination). It was only tagged with the label “music”, later on as it grew in popularity & starting to hit mainstream radio. Today, rap flourishes & is broadly accepted as music. Whether this is the case, is another debate. My previous comment merely pointed to the root & not the current state.

    Sidebar: What the hell is wrong with you? Through the whole comments section you have been nothing but negative & a pain in the ass. We got your point, but you do not seem to be open-minded about others’ perspectives.

  5. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 10:12:00

    you know jack shit about hip hop if you think it wasn’t intended as music. Do just a little bit more research.

  6. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 10:10:00

    I just wish you tone down your “passion” to truly get my point. But you don’t. All good. Thanks for the views.

  7. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 10:09:00

    I would.

    I can appreciate that Mr. Muthafuckin’ eXquire video where he and his crew throw bills on a stripper. I don’t like it, but I get its intention.

  8. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 10:05:00

    Its okay andrew i’ll leave you alone. what got me mad is the fact that you wanted to act like you were aiming for music in general when that was just a cover. No vitriol on my part, just passion. Hope our little discussion makes you a better thinker.

  9. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 10:01:00

    Hell no it isn’t but answer my question. Would you be able to distinguish between those guys doing it for the look and someone else doing it for art? I doubt you would andrew.

  10. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:54:00

    What the hell would I have to gain by lying? Man, this was one of the most honest things I wrote, and the same goes for my replies. If you can’t see through your own vitriol then just fuck off, I guess.

  11. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:49:00

    Come on Andrew, you know deep down that you’re lying bro. You were aiming for hip hop. I read your article with the best intentions, also thinking I would agree with most of what you said. But you were in over your head trying to blame hip hop as my article surely pointed out to you.

  12. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:49:00

    Three minutes of Rozay, Wale, and them at a stripclub ain’t art. It’s lazy pandering.

  13. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:42:00

    Honest question, would you be able to recognize the artistic purpose of throwing money at a stripper in a video, if the artist did it with artistic intentions you didn’t know about? I doubt it, because you have pre conceived ideas about what women represent in hip hop. And I know you can come up with a better excuse than the fact that this is a hip hop site. Own up to the fact that you wanted to call out hip hop for the most part.

  14. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:28:00

    Shit dude, he agrees with me: “If misogynistic hip-hop was erased from American life and memory today, tomorrow my e-mail box and the e-mail boxes of millions of others would still be barraged with links to tens of thousands of adult entertainment web sites. We would still have at our fingertips, courtesy of cable and satellite television, porn-on-demand.”

    My overall point isn’t about just hip-hop, but our culture in general. Again, I called out some hip-hop and R&B artists because that’s what I cover on a daily basis.

  15. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:22:00

    Sigh. Just put things into context. This is primarily a hip-hop site, hence my numerous examples from that community.

    And if you think Rick Ross is using strip club videos as a means of furthering his “art,” I really feel for you.

    There’s a huge gap between an artistic depiction of a naked body and a video featuring dudes throwing bills on strippers for three minutes.

  16. Sebastien
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:08:00

    Just read the article. He doesn’t cite an example of mysogyny in music that isn’t hip hop. In the fat joe paragraph, he refuses to believe rap artists are using the images for art. There is so much wrong with this article, but he hid it behind the veil of a critique of general music, when he just doesn’t have the balls or knowledge to call out hip hop. Thats why he’s scared of my article. I’m half white btw just to nip his little race thing in the bud.

  17. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:08:00

    Well said.

  18. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:07:00

    ha

  19. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:07:00

    that Death Grips shit was stupid too

  20. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 09:07:00

    Thank you.

  21. TeoneSofle
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:47:00

    Logically speaking & going back to the roots of hip-hop, I do not believe it was intended to be “music” rather it was initially defined as poetry. My, the times have changed. In your words, define “music”…

  22. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:47:00

    Thank you. And I agree, it’s difficult to find a stopping point in this discussion. If nothing else, I wanted to shed light on an issue important to me and I’m just glad others share my view and appreciate it.

  23. TeoneSofle
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:46:00

    hmmm…do you think that there are other environmental factors (or pressure) surrounding the artist, such as the corporate business who make demands to sell a certain amount or else, the consumers who ask for such crude image/videos, the money (yes, money talks) etc. Anyway, this discussion, although stimulating & thought provoking, would never end. In the end, you wrote a good article. Cheers.

  24. Joy
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:45:00

    1. who is “we”? 2. why don’t you just stop reading the article? 3. why would someone who thinks rap isn’t music be the editor of a hip-hop site?

  25. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:38:00

    My target is the artist who uses this shit as a cheap way to get attention.

  26. TeoneSofle
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 08:35:00

    Good article. But you did not make clear, who or what you were aiming your criticism at; was it towards the fat-cats of the music industry, towards hip-hop, towards the directors & designers, towards mainstream music…
    Rest assured, at least you – and unfortunately, a small amount of people – are conscious of this encroaching culture.

  27. Andrew Martin
    Oct 19, 2012 @ 07:03:00

    The second one, the stupid thing.

  28. Sebastien
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 23:13:00

    Did you even read the article? This is beyond race. Or are you just stupid?

  29. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 22:27:00

    Oh it is a race thing now? Ha.

  30. Sebastien
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 22:13:00

  31. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 21:07:00

    Thank you for reading and completely missing my point

  32. Sebastien
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 19:39:00

    I just read your bullshit article again andrew, and i’m even more pissed the second time. what pisses me off is that you act like you’re talking about music in general when we all know this is just another ‘misogyny in hip hop’ article. You’re probably one of those people who think rap isn’t music. From the bottom of my heart, Fuck you andrew.

  33. Sebastien
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 19:20:00

    Full of shit article. If you’re going to come out against hip hop then just do it. I’m sick and tired of this bullshit faux-feminism front guys put up so they can finger bang dumb girls at art exhibitions. there is more misogyny in classic literature, visual arts and music than hip hop can fit in a million uncle luke videos. Fuck you Andrew, I can smell the fake from here.

  34. Saxon Baird
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 18:05:00

    I was thinking of him too but of the lou ferrigno vid but its kind of fun and not exploitative.

  35. Đ℞ΞV/
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 15:25:00

    so Death Grips album cover? i know there is a clean version but i was like whatever, you know this is there art i’ll keep it there, i am a liberal dude, i am not a homophobe. but at the gym i realize someone might see the picture on my iPhone attached to arm band and think i am flashing my own dick at them. or if you look at my iTunes playlist which is in album picture mode they will see it too. so i had to change it. cause vaginas and breasts are okay, they are accepted, the only dick that is accepted as none threatening is either Nirvana’s album cover or if your watching Dragon Ball

  36. DREK
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 13:42:00

    I think it has it’s place. Like in the Mr. Muthafuckin Exquire vid Position of Passion. I think that the nudity in that video reflects his music, his lifestyle and his message.

  37. Michael Jon Carter
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 13:33:00

    rappers throwing bills at strip clubs also has a message………..make sure your daughter doesnt end up on the pole.

  38. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 13:30:00

    How? That video had a message.

  39. Michael Jon Carter
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:59:00

    The same could be said about Murs Animal Style video.

  40. MissMallibu
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:52:00

    I agree– there is no single solution, and there is no definitive line to draw. I think it can be said though, that our culture has succumb to the standards of the porn industry more than ever. Exhibit A: NBC’s bro-approved slow motion video of female Olympians. There is no woman strong or powerful enough who can’t in a moment’s time have her power taken away by mainstream media, artists, or otherwise, and be reduced to a voiceless object.

    My thing is, people have the right to watch, talk about, and produce porn. But people also have the right to not feel weird or ashamed when they feel it’s become too rampant, when they feel women have been reduced to body parts on tap for a lazy industry of cool, and when they feel it’s time to pump the brakes on the race to the cultural bottom.

    Sex as a selling point is inescapable, but I hope we can eventually squash the mentality that there’s nothing we can do and that there’s no point in talking about it.

  41. Zach Moldof
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:50:00

    I think you make some really good points Andrew. As you imply in your final paragraphs, the problem isn’t just one of ill taste turning up cheap thrills, it’s ill-conceived art grasping for any straws to increase sales, and sex is just the lowest hanging fruit. The larger issue is that artists of serious substance rarely make it to a place where they garner such acclaim as Fat Joe, or Mario. So, the people on the front line aren’t folks that are trying to make compelling art, they’re just trying to make a buck.

    I am every bit as guilty, although I’d like to believe that my approach is wholly different because it’s deeply informed by cultural knowledge, and a knowledge of art history. If you ask me about any of the more risque art I’ve created there is a substantial conversation to go along with it. And I personally also have a history as an artist that extends well beyond cover art, which is well-filled with brazen sexuality.

    In my opinion, hip hop has morphed into a platform where many people–artists, industry folks, and audience alike–grapple with sexuality. We live in such hyper-sexualized times that implicitly create such grotesque expectations. To me, rap music is actually a productive means by which we can mitigate the outrageous impulses that are forced on us through the constant barrage of media. That’s not to say that everyone is acting with intention that validates their actions, but the possibility is there.

  42. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:39:00

    But…did you read the rest? haha

  43. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:39:00

    I’m really talking music in general.

  44. Melquan Jones
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 12:38:00

    Are we talking about the same Hip Hop here? Because what people think Hip Hop is versus what Hip Hop actually is, are totally two different discussions.

  45. Jheri Evans
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 11:47:00

    Meh, I watch everything NSFW I post, homie. My thoughts are that if you’re working, you shouldn’t be on this blog in the first place. I don’t give a fuck how cool your boss is and what downtime you have, if you are on someone’s clock working to earn their money, do your job and surf the internet on YOUR time.

  46. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:52:00

    Thanks, Matt.

  47. Caleb Stone
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:44:00

    my new album is called “see this pussy” tho

  48. Matt Siverson
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:15:00

    Excellent write-up. As a father of two young girls, I wonder how I can even share hip-hop with my daughters when they get old enough to appreciate it.

  49. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:11:00

    unfortunately, you might be right

  50. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:10:00

    I’m sayin’. And one of my biggest issues is that bloggers don’t watch the shit so it’s not labeled as NSFW or whatever.

  51. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:09:00

    WELL SAID

  52. Imakemad Beats
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:05:00

    Sadly, I don’t see this changing anytime soon, if ever, really. Sex has been selling for thousands of years. As soon as a new idea to sell/promote anything arrives, best believe sex will be involved in one of the first successful attempts at using said idea.

  53. Saxon Baird
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 10:04:00

    Nice article, man. I feel like the hyper-sexualized aesthetic of hip-hop makes is part of the reason why many trash hip-hop. It always annoys the hell out of us when someone complains about how “rap is just cars and naked chicks…” and we do our best to defend it. But in a way, deep down, we know that to a certain extent they are right. So much of it is the same old tired strip-club video and recycled lines about how many strippers they’ve laid. As we know, there’s a ton of hip-hop that ISN’T doing that, but in the end that’s what gets the most airplay most of the time. I DO think there is a place for it, but it’s so prevalent now that it’s just become tiring. Dig deeper into that bag of tricks!

    And on another anecdotal note, as someone who lives in a somewhat gritty neighborhood in Brooklyn, that shit totally has a huge impression on the youth in my hood. I can’t tell you how many times my 16-year old neighbor Miguel wants me to listen and watch the latest 2 Chainz video. No matter what I show him he just shrugs and wants to watch 2 Chainz.

  54. kibbe
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 09:57:00

    I’ll try to save the rant about how using lady parts further makes lots of us ladies feel like goods that men trade and sell for another time. I do have to agree wholeheartedly with what you’re saying here. It’s not just in hip hop either. One particular video stands out in my mind of some indie band that shot a video of two topless girls drinking wine and making out. That was the whole premise to the video. Seriously? Has every idea under the sun been used up already? Could you not have come up with something more compelling? If you’re getting the same amount of emails that SKOA does, the amount of mediocre snoozefest bands that are out in the universe right now is just mind boggling. It’s no wonder that we’ve had to dumb everything down and resort to hocking lady parts in order to get ahead. Alternatively, I’ve seen some gorgeous videos where there is nudity involved that nearly moved me to tears. It has to be done correctly and not just as an easy way to get views/plays.

  55. Andrew Martin
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 09:52:00

    good point ha

  56. brodman
    Oct 18, 2012 @ 09:39:00

    Wish I could say that it will eventually stop man, buuuut Tyga is only 22 y/o so i dont see the videos going away anytime soon

Leave a Reply